Child Development in Spanish

Asking About Developmental Milestones in Spanish

Child Development in SpanishLearn how to talk about child development in Spanish. In this clinical encounter, Marcela’s mother brings her in for a routine examination and the doctor asks about different developmental milestones.

OJO: The level of this audio lesson is more advanced.

Clinical Encounter

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Gracias por escuchar. Thanks for listening. The lessons offered at docmolly.com are a fun way to practice medical Spanish. They are not intended to provide medical advice.


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I would love to hear from you. If you have a question or feedback about this audio lesson, please leave a comment under this post. I usually respond within 24 hours. ¡Gracias!


  • Hi Molly! I have never hears the word “rastrear.” Iʻve heard “medir” … Is it commonly used in a certain country or region? I learned Spanish in Mexico and later lived in Guatemala. Just wondering. Thank you so much for your programs!

    • Hello Rachel,

      Thank you for your comment. I wrote this dialogue with a Spanish teacher from Mexico, Ángel Bahena, so I assume “rastrear” is commonly used in Mexico. However, I’m not sure if it is more common in certain regions than others. A quick Google search shows that it is commonly used to refer to “tracking” the development of something. “Medir” works as well but is less specific, meaning simply “to measure.” Whereas “rastrear” indicates that you are “tracking” your measurements over time, as one does at a well-child visit.

      I hope that helps. Please reply if you have further questions or comments, and thanks again for the comment!

      Molly

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