AD06 Probar el medicamento – Review

Welcome to the first interactive audio lesson covering the vocabulary, key phrases, and grammar in the clinical encounter: ADHD in Spanish – Medicamentos controlados In this lesson, the doctor asks Nicole if she would like to take a medication to help her pay attention. He explains she will have to make an effort in order for it to work. Finally, he instructs her that she should only take the medication when given to her and that she must not share it with friends. 

LEVEL – ADVANCED   

Amerita probar el medicamento

0:57

Doctor: Creo que Nicole amerita probar el medicamento. ¿Qué piensas Nicole? ¿Cómo sería la vida si pudieras prestar atención, terminar tu tarea, y no tener que perder el receso? ¿Sería bueno?

Nicole: Sería buenísimo, doctor.


amerita, merecer(se)
to deserve

OJO: AMERITAR is commonly used in Latin America to say that someone deserves something. You could also use MERECER(SE) in this way. “Nicole (se) merece probar el medicamento.” We use the verb PROBAR when we are trying something out.

Creo que Nicole amerita probar el medicamento.
I think Nicole deserves to try the medication.

prestar/poner atención
to pay attention

el receso/recreo
recess

¿Cómo sería la vida si pudieras prestar/poner atención, terminar tu tarea, y no tener que perder(se) el receso/recreo?
What would life be like if you could pay attention, finish your homework and not have to miss recess?

OJO: This is an example of a CONDITIONAL (IF… THEN…) STATEMENT, where we state the HYPOTHETICAL condition using the IMPERFECT SUBJUNCTIVE and the result of that condition using the CONDITIONAL.  To practice more phrases like this, see: Subj15 Conditional Statements and Subj16 Conditional Statements.

Dar lo mejor de ti

3:59

D: Estoy de acuerdo contigo. Significa que tendrás que intentar dar lo mejor de ti todo el tiempo. Te vamos a dar una medicina que tú vas a tomar todos los días. La medicina te va a ayudar a tomar buenas decisiones, como a prestar atención. Pero recuerda: tienes que querer enfocarte y prestar atención.


lo mejor de ti
the best of yourself

OJO: When LO precedes the masculine form of an adjective it forms an abstract noun. How would you say….

Significa que tendrás que intentar dar lo mejor de ti todo el tiempo.
That means you will have to try your best all the time.

tomar buenas / mejores decisiones
to make good / better decisions

OJO: Note how the adjective goes before the noun when we say “buenas” or “mejores decisiones.” As we learned in the lesson: Adjectives Before Nouns in Spanish, the adjective often precedes the noun when it expresses a subjective quality or opinion about something.

La medicina te va a ayudar a tomar buenas decisiones.
The medication will help you make good decisions.

OJO: The doctor uses “medicina” y “medicamento” to refer to the “medication.” 

enfocarte, centrarse
to focus

Pero recuerda: tienes que querer enfocarte y prestar atención.
But remember: you have to want to focus and pay attention.

No va a detenerte

6:17

Si quieres jugar en vez de enfocarte, distrayendo a los demás, entonces el medicamento no va a detenerte. Pero si quieres tomar mejores decisiones, entonces sería más fácil hacerlo así cuando tomes la medicina. Y recuerda, sólo toma la medicina cuando tu mamá te la de. ¿De acuerdo?

N: Sí, de acuerdo.


distraer, distraerse
to distract, to get distracted

los demás
the rest, other people, everyone else

detener
to stop

Si quieres jugar en vez de enfocarte, distrayendo a los demás, entonces el medicamento no va a detenerte.
If you want to play instead of focusing, distracting others, then the medication is not going to stop you.

Pero si quieres tomar mejores decisiones, entonces sería más fácil hacerlo así cuando tomes la medicina.
But if you want to make better decisions, then it would be easier to do so when you take the medication.

Sería más fácil hacerlo así…
It would be easier to do so…

…cuando tomes la medicina.
…when you take the medication.

OJO: The SUBJUNCTIVE follows CUANDO when we are referring to a FUTURE EVENT. If she were already taking the medication and we were referring to a RECURRING EVENT, we would use the INDICATIVE. “Es más fácil tomar mejores decisiones cuando tomas la medicina.” (See: Quiz # 4 – The Subjunctive in Adverbial Clauses, Spanish Grammar members, see Subj12 Time Clauses and Subj13 Time Clauses.) Since he is referring to the future above, it may actually be more clear to begin with the future tense and say: 

“Será más fácil hacerlo así cuando tomes la medicina.”

Y recuerda, sólo toma la medicina cuando tu mamá te la de.
And remember, only take the medicine when your mom gives it to you.

¿De acuerdo?
Alright?

Sí, de acuerdo.
Yes, I got it.

Una medicina especial

11:07

D: También ésta es una medicina muy especial. Si una amiga te pidiera prestársela siempre tienes que decirle a que no.


prestar
to lend, borrow

prestársela
to lend it to her (where “it” = la medicina)

Si una amiga te pidiera prestársela,
If a friend were to ask you to lend it to her,

OJO: When speaking hypothetically, we use the IMPERFECT SUBJUNCTIVE following “si” to present the HYPOTHETICAL CONDITION,  and we use the CONDITIONAL to present the HYPOTHETICAL CONSEQUENCE of that condition: 

“Si te pidiera prestársela, siempre tendrías que decirle que no.”

To speak more frankly about a REAL POSSIBILITY,  we use the PRESENT tense: 

“Si una amiga te pide prestársela, siempre tienes que decirle que no.”

In this case, Francisco chose to switch to the present tense in order to emphasize that she has to say no.  

Siempre tienes que decirle que no.
You always have to say no.

Si una amiga te pidiera que se la prestara, tendrías que decirle que no.
If a friend asked you to lend it to her, you would have to say no.

OJO: When a VERB OF INFLUENCE is preceded by an INDIRECT OBJECT PRONOUN, you can follow that verb with either an INFINITIVE or the SUBJUNCTIVE.  (Spanish Grammar members see: Subj04 Subjunctive Following Verbs of Influence.)


And that completes today’s lesson. In the next lesson, we will practice explaining a controlled substance agreement. 

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Special Thanks

The original clinical encounter for this lesson was written in English by a listener, Dr. Craig Horn, a pediatrician who serves patients with ADHD. My friend Sonja Um-Siri (an interpreter) translated the encounter into Spanish with her teacher Francisco González Yojcóm while studying at the San Pedro Spanish School in Guatemala. We then recorded the encounter with Francisco, my teacher, Elizabeth Cortez, and Eliza’s daughter, Nicole.  Muchísimas gracias a todos.

The lessons offered at docmolly.com are a fun way to practice medical Spanish. They are not intended to teach medicine or provide medical advice. These lessons are intended to improve communication with Spanish-speaking patients, but they are not intended to substitute for a qualified medical interpreter.


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